If you receive emails or calls regarding the renewal of your vehicle warranty, do not take the information at face value. Your vehicle`s warranty may be far from expiring – or it has already expired. If you have a question about your warranty, read the user manual, call the dealer who sold you the car or contact the vehicle manufacturer. If you are buying a new or used car, the seller may encourage you to purchase a car service contract to protect you from unexpected or expensive repairs. While a service contract may seem like a good idea, it may overlap with the warranty of the vehicle`s existing manufacturer. So before you spend the extra money, research whether a car service contract is useful. Coverage varies widely. If you enter into a vehicle service contract, you do not need to select the first offer you come across. Are there too many exclusions? Are certain parts excluded, unless they have been damaged by another covered party? Read the fine print and ask questions. If you have a problem with a car service contract, first try to resolve the dispute with the provider.

If that doesn`t work, talk to your attorney general, the public insurance board, or the local consumer protection agency. You can also file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. If you decide to purchase a service contract through a reseller – and the contract is supported by an administrator or a third party – make sure that the merchant forwards your payment and that you get written confirmation. Some people discovered too late that the merchant had not forwarded their payment, so they no longer had coverage months after signing a contract. Contact your local or national consumer protection office if you have reason to believe that your contract has not been concluded as agreed. Also beware of unscrupulous dealers who may try to include an auto service contract in your loan without your consent. If you see a fee for a service agreement that you didn`t accept, tell the merchant to enter into it before signing the credit agreement. In other words, you can think of a factory warranty as an actual warranty. It promises a car free of material defects and it is included in the price of the new vehicle. These pitches more than likely come from independent companies that want to sell you extended warranties — more specifically known as service contracts — that are often sold for hundreds or thousands of dollars. If you`re answering a call from a company that features so-called extended warranties, you`ll likely hear high-pressure sales tactics, as well as requests for personal financial information and a down payment before you get details about the service contract.

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